‘The Beginning of Rvnnymede’

The Runnymede Stone.

In the woods near the town of Mayberry in Western Maryland there is a stone, not very large but big enough to have been selected as a marker by someone who wanted it to stay put for generations, upon which is engraved the single phrase THE BEGINNING OF RVNNYMEDE. Continue reading

Advertisements

Jean Ella (LeGall) Fleagle, 1922 – 2017

Jean Fleagle, 1940s.

My Aunt Jean passed away earlier this year at age 94. She was the aunt who was most closely involved with me and my siblings as we grew up in Bellevue, Washington, since she and Uncle Dick and my cousin Gary lived just a few miles away in Kirkland. My dad’s sisters back East, my blood relations Miriam and Vivian, came into my consciousness much later, but the west-coast ladies Continue reading

‘Alas our daughter’ – Harner graves at Trinity Lutheran Cemetery, Taneytown

The bannered arch at Trinity Lutheran Cemetery, Taneytown, Maryland. My great great grandfather James Harner’s stone is visible inside the frame formed by the gate posts and banner, on the left side of the opening. I’ve put a small, yellow-green arrow pointing to it.

My great grandmother Martha Jane Harner came from around Longville, a bend in the road between the two Western Maryland towns of Taneytown and Harney. Continue reading

Earl Stake, shotgun

Earl Stake and companion waiting for Godot, or someone with a box-end wrench.

This enchanting photograph comes with no information except the identification of the rider in the front passenger seat, my great uncle Earl (X marks the spot), whom I met only once probably three score years after the shutter fell on this scene. Continue reading

Baily’s forlorn little stone at Frizzellburg

Frizellburg Bible Church was originally the Church of God, but I’m not sure exactly which parts were original. Definitely the middle, maybe.

At the far end of a grassy field in Frizzellburg, Maryland, bowered and barely noticeable beneath the outer boughs of a little wood, are thirty gravestones in two neat lines. A good number of them are small stones marking children’s graves, Continue reading